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Teaching stint, book advance, travel among justices' perks

The judge's gavel is seen in court room 422 of the New York Supreme Court at 60 Centre Street February 3, 2012. Picture taken February 3, 20
The judge's gavel is seen in court room 422 of the New York Supreme Court at 60 Centre Street February 3, 2012. Picture taken February 3, 20

By Amanda Becker

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A Mediterranean island teaching stint, a nearly $2 million book advance and trips around the world to judge architecture were among the side benefits enjoyed by the nine U.S. Supreme Court justices last year.

Justice Sonia Sotomayor reported more non-investment income than any other member of the court in 2012, thanks to a $1.925 million advance from Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group for her memoir "My Beloved World." That was on top of $1.175 million she received for the book in 2010, bringing the total income for telling her life story to more than $3 million so far.

Sotomayor's book income appeared on the annual financial disclosure report that all justices must complete. The reports, released on Friday, were reviewed by Reuters. The filings detail the justices' outside positions, sources of income, travel reimbursements and investment values, the last of which are reported in broad ranges.

Justice Stephen Breyer served as a juror for the Pritzker Architecture Prize last year, and the role took him all over the world. Breyer reported being reimbursed for trips to England, China, Mozambique and South Africa by Pritzker or its sponsor, the Hyatt Foundation. He judged the prize again in 2013.

Breyer also reported being sent to The Hague in the Netherlands, Cambridge in Britain and Paris and Marseilles in France by private groups for various programs and conferences.

Chief Justice John Roberts received $20,000 and air transportation, meals and lodging in Valletta, Malta, for a six-day course he taught on the history of the Supreme Court for the New England School of Law, also known as New England Law, just after the court upheld President Barack Obama's 2010 healthcare overhaul.

Justices Clarence Thomas, Elena Kagan, Antonin Scalia and Ruth Bader Ginsburg likewise reported teaching income. Thomas taught at George Washington University Law School; Kagan at Harvard College; Scalia at John Marshall Law School, St. John's University, St. Mary's University, the University of Southern California and Wesleyan University; and Ginsburg at a European summer program run by Wake Forest School of Law.

Ginsburg also reported receiving $15,819 for a two-day guest lecture at Yale University in October. Scalia reported receiving nearly $64,000 from West Services Inc, a division of Thomson Reuters, which has published "Making Your Case: The Art of Persuading Judges" and "Reading Law: The Interpretation of Legal Texts," both of which Scalia co-authored.

Of the disclosures released on Friday, only that of Justice Anthony Kennedy showed no outside non-investment income. Justice Samuel Alito has yet to file his report, which can occur anytime between now and mid August.

(Editing by Howard Goller and Paul Simao)

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